The Bosu Ball

The Bosu ball (pronounced Bow-Sue) was developed in 1999, and got its name from its functionality – ‘Both Sides Up’.

Since its introduction, the Bosu ball has been a fantastic addition to many gyms, whether it be for increasing stability or challenging the elite.

How is a BOSU different to a Swiss ball?

Bosu balls are distinctive because of their shape. The simplest way to describe it is as a swiss ball ‘cut in half’ with a hard plastic base. The plastic base can be used to stabilise the swiss-ball side and create a soft but round platform for extended sit-ups or even assisted lunges. If you’re brave enough to place the swiss-ball side down, you will have a hard plastic platform to balance on. Some may complete squats whilst balancing on the hard plastic platform, complete push-ups while stabilising the ball or even change the game with handstands.

Why do we love bosu balls?

For us at Progressive Physiotherapy, we love to use the Bosu ball for rehabilitation, maintenance and development. It is a fantastic way to help re-build muscles and nerves around areas of concern, and most importantly help our clients develop confidence back after long-term injury. Bosu balls are great for improving stability, as well as helping the body recognise over-movement of joints, muscles and ligaments and correct the movement, before injury occurs.

Could a Bosu Ball work for me?

YES! Bosu balls are so versatile they can work in with almost any routine. Whether your goal is rehabilitation, or you are looking for a different type of challenge, the Bosu Ball has a lot to offer. Before going to the internet, and googling all your workouts, we recommend coming in to chat about your needs and how a Bosu Ball could best suit you. This means we can complete a full assessment, check where your body is currently at and recommend ways to integrate it into your routine so you benefit the most!

Suzanne graduated from Western Sydney University with a Bachelor of Health Science (Sports and Exercise Science) in 2015. She then went on to continue her studies at Macquarie University graduating from the Doctor of Physiotherapy post-graduate degree in June 2019.

Since graduating, Suzanne has worked in the local Penrith area in both private practice and Sports Physiotherapy. Suzanne has worked with sporting teams including Penrith District Netball Association, Mt Druitt Rangers (NPL), Penrith Valley Figure Skating Club, and local dance and cheer schools. 

Suzanne has a particular interest in working with artistic athletes including cheerleaders and dancers. She has a professional background in both cheer and dance and has previously worked as both a cheer coach and dance teacher. Suzanne’s previous experiences are an invaluable resource to her as a physiotherapist, as she has a thorough understanding of the level of physical fitness and skill acquisition that these athletes must have in order to be successful on stage and in competition.

Suzanne’s other areas of clinical interest reside in lower limb musculoskeletal injuries, spinal pathologies and women’s health.

Nathanial graduated as a physiotherapist in 2012 which saw him work in private practice and hospital settings gaining experience in all areas of physiotherapy including hand therapy, splinting/casting, pre/post-operative care, Men’s Health and general musculoskeletal, occupational and sports physiotherapy. Since then he has gone on to complete further studies in physiotherapy enabling him to be the only dual titled Musculoskeletal, Sports and Exercise Physiotherapist in Penrith.

Nathanial has a strong background in sports physiotherapy achieving accreditation with NSWIS as a service provider and working with many elite sports teams.

Nathanial has a particular interest in working with elite athletes, complex cases and in particular assessment and management of knee, hip and shoulder pain.

Andrea graduated from the Australian Catholic University completing her Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Science in 2018 and Master’s of Clinical Exercise Physiology in 2020. After graduating she attained accreditation with ESSA as an Exercise Physiologist.

During her studies she gained clinical experience in both hospital and private practice settings, working in the cardiac rehabilitation program, heart failure service and mental health unit at Nepean Hospital. And at the ACU Exercise and Lifestyle Clinic working with clients with neurological conditions, cancer and chronic musculoskeletal injuries.

Since graduating, Andrea enjoys working with a variety of clients. She has a particular interest in treating musculoskeletal injuries and neurological conditions, striving to help people increase their functional capacity to get them back to work, sport or the things they love doing.